Creating your Business Facebook Page in 10 Easy Steps

Set up your business on Facebook in 10 easy steps

If you still haven’t created a Facebook page for your business here’s two reasons to help change your mind!

If your company is trying to market goods, products or services over the web then a Facebook page will almost certainly improve your internet search results.

Have we convinced you? Here’s how you can create a Facebook page in just 10 simple steps:

1. Set up a personal Facebook account (if you don’t already have one).

2. Navigate to the Create a Page link, where you will be presented with six main categories. Pick the one that best describes your business type: Local Business or Place; Company, Organization, or Institution; Brand or Product; Artist, Band, or Public Figure; Entertainment; and Cause or Community.

3. Choose a name for your Facebook page. Once you have selected a category, you will be prompted to pick a name. Be careful with this as your choice is irreversible once you have more than 100 page fans. It will also be part of the URL of your Facebook page, which is important for SEO reasons.

4. Set up your basic information. Once you have taken this step, you can use the Facebook page dashboard to fill out information such as its physical location, contact details, website, and so on.

5. Set up Page administrators. These are people who will be responsible for adding new information and content to your page? Various roles are available but the one with the broadest control is Manager, which gives that person the right to send messages, create posts using the page’s identity, create ads, and look at the insights reports. Other roles include Content Creator, Moderator, Advertiser, and Insights Analyst.

6. Add your visual identity. Your page’s structure is similar to that of your personal Facebook profile, which means you can add both a profile photo, usually your logo or some other existing business identifier, and a cover photo, which is something that relates to your business.

7. Add events and photos to your Timeline to give your Facebook page more personality. Give your followers more information about your company’s history and accomplishments, add memorable dates, such as when the business was founded, reached certain milestones, or won an award etc. Photos are a great way to bring these to life!

8. Promote your Facebook page. Once you’re happy with your page it’s time to start building a following. Start by sending an invitation to existing contacts asking them to visit and “like” your page. You can also consider using paid advertisements to highlight the page to would be customers.

9. Nurture your creation. Facebook pages thrive through regular updates and there are also many ways you can give your page personality, for example, adding a link to a YouTube video, an app or link to your e-commerce site. Interactivity is also key, so make sure to respond to comments, questions and feedback in order help foster conversations around your business.

10. “Like” other Facebook pages related to your business, industry or community. Using your Facebook page to connect with related businesses will help get your page in front of more potential followers.

 

Our Top 10 LinkedIn Tips

How to get started on LinkedIn - our top 10 tips!Having a presence on LinkedIn is becoming more important and to ensure it’s starting to work for you we’ve put together our Top Ten Tips for building your profile.

  1. Complete your profile 100%
    LinkedIn keeps good track of your profile completeness. It is in your best interest to complete your profile. Include past and current work history, a summary, skills you’ve learned, etc.
  2. Post a professional image of you in your profile
    One place a photo is helpful in getting noticed is LinkedIn. It adds to your credibility and makes your profile look professional. But remember to only use a professional image. This is defined as a head and shoulders portrait of you.
  3. Complete your current title and summary
    Your title should be genuine. Your summary should be a short, concise two or three paragraphs that should answer 3 basic questions- who are you, what do you do, and who do you do it for? Within your summary use keywords that will help you get found in LinkedIn search for example if you are a marketing professional, use keywords such as social media marketing, public relations etc.
  4. Complete your past experiences and specialisations
    Specialisations should answer the question – what makes you unique from everyone else in your line of work?
  5. Follow industry experts
    By following industry leaders you will keep up to date with the latest news, topics and thought leadership in that arena. It also adds to your credibility in your industry.
  6. Join relevant groups
    Primarily LinkedIn is known for its groups. Groups can be private or public. Find the ones that you are interested in to network, share experiences and in which you can learn and give your opinions.
  7. Get recommendations
    Recommendations are synonymous with references. Recommendations give insight on what you are like as a person and your work ethic.
  8. Be active
    Just like a website your profile is more likely to be viewed when you are actively updating and partcipating.  Make sure you use all the tools available to keep your profile up to date and use the status bar to provide comment on interesting industry news.
  9. Edit websites to be actual website names instead of “company website”
    So many times we have come across “Company Website” within the Websites section. Change that generic phrase to the actual name of your company, blog, or Twitter handle.
  10. Promote!
    Use LinkedIn to become an active member of the online community relevant to your industry. Participate in group discussions, review white papers and look to network via these methods. This will help you stand out and increase your credibility.

8 Reasons You Should Be Using Facebook Ads

The rise of social media as an advertising platform is redefining the online marketing landscape for small and medium businesses.

Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram have all jumped aboard the juggernaut – soon to be joined by Snapchat – giving advertisers more pathways than ever to target their market directly through social media.

Two clear strategies are now available: Keyword searchers ‘Pull’ ads from Google using Adwords, while advertisers ‘Push’ traffic through display ads on social newsfeeds using Twitter Cards and Facebook ads. Both methods use Pay Per Click (PPC) technology.

The choices are welcome news for SMEs with relatively small marketing budgets who have given up on generic banner advertising due to shockingly low Click Through Rates (CTRs).

While conversion rates for Google Adwords are generally higher because they are being viewed by people in research mode, targeted social media display ads commonly have a larger audience. Converting a smaller percentage of a much bigger audience potentially generates more revenue in a more cost effective way.

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(Image by mkhmarketing Flickr)

For businesses with active social media profiles that focus on building trust and respect through transparency and genuine engagement, attracting new customers this way can increase brand loyalty and repeat business.

Without question, spreading the marketing spend across both the ‘Push’and ‘Pull’ channels makes sense, which is why social media advertising is beginning to have its day in the sun.

But results with both strategies can be patchy, unless advertising is accompanied by rigorous testing, frequent reviews and rapid changes. If one tactic doesn’t get results, scrap it and move onto the next.

Benefits of Facebook Ads

  • Cheaper: The average Cost Per Click (CPC) of Facebook Ads is about $0.90 compared with about $2.70 for Adwords.
  • Faster: Facebook ads can reach an audience quickly. Target audience can be altered and tested on the run. Campaigns are shorter, more flexible and get faster results
  • Better targeting: Facebook Ads can be targeted to as broad or narrow a market as desired and can be specific to a particular campaign or as wide as an age demographic.
  • Retargeting: Like Google Adwords, Facebook Ads can follow users anonymously as they travel the web if they have already clicked on an ad.
  • More control: The advertiser can determine who sees the ad and how many times they click on it.
  • Brand building: Facebook leverages off word-of-mouth and the concept of social proof. Noticing that a friend already “Likes” a product helps break down barriers of trust more quickly than with advertising alone.

What the numbers say

  • The time mobile users are spending on Facebook is now almost the same as Google: Mobile Internet users are spending 17% of their time on Facebook compared with 18% of their time on all Google channels.
  • Twitter and Facebook are topping the charts for online advertising revenue growth in the US on all devices: At 79% and 47% respectively, Twitter and Facebook are easily leaving Google’s annual ad revenue growth of 33% in the shade.

Stats released recently in a US study by BIA/Kelsey showed small businesses spending on social media activities for a range of purposes is continuing to grow. More than half of those surveyed confirmed they had a business page on Facebook and one in five had bought a Facebook Ad or Promoted Post.

The study also found businesses were using social networks to:

  • Build an online brand.
  • Listen and respond to what is being said about their business.
  • Recruit new employees.

These trends show social media not only generates leads for small businesses, it is a key tool for managing relationships with customers, employees and the wider public.

When combined with a strategy that seeks to add value, educate and inform an audience, businesses are seeing positive results in a range of social media marketing metrics.

It all adds up to a strong case for SMEs to include social media advertising in their marketing plans. At the very least, it’s a good way to build a base for your business on a range of social media channels and to drive traffic to your website generally or for specific campaigns.

Market Smarter with Facebook’s Custom Audiences and your own Email Lists

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What is Facebook advertising?

Facebook advertising allows businesses to pay Facebook to show custom ads or content to a specific target audience, with costs varying based on the reach and number of engagement the ad receives. Facebooks ads can appear in your target audience’s News Feed on desktop, News Feed on mobile, and in the right column of Facebook on desktop.

Custom Audiences

Custom audiences are a great chance to market to people you already know are interested in your company’s products or services. While email newsletters can be a great way to reach people why not also try an alternative to the traditional use of the email address by creating your very own customised audience. Here’s the basic process:

  • Take your email list file (easily exported from services like Mailchimp, Constant Contact or Outlook etc.) and upload it to Facebook (by the way, Twitter also recently released a similar feature).
  • On Facebook, you upload the list of email addresses to your page, and Facebook will match these emails to actual Facebook users.
  • When using ad targeting, you select the Custom Audience you just made and can create ads to re-engage users that have already expressed an interest. A great way to upsell to existing customers!

Interesting Possibilities for Custom Audience Marketing:

  • Target influential users e.g. journalists, bloggers
  • Target employees of a specific Company or Organization
  • Target existing Customers to get them to become Facebook fans
  • Exclude your current Customers and/or Subscribers
  • Target prospects who never open your emails
  • Target your LinkedIn connections
  • Target just your top Customers

To find out how Facebook advertising can help your business please email us.

Top 10 Reasons Why Businesses Need a Facebook Page

The Top 3 Benefits of Social Media for Business

Social media for business

Sharing content with thousands of followers at once isn’t the only benefit of social media for business. Small businesses all over the world have been discovering the ways social media can contribute to success and growth in all areas of their companies. However, there are still sceptics who still don’t see or understand the benefits of social media for their business. In this post, we go over the top 3 benefits of social media for business that will turn sceptics into believers.

1. Social media helps find new customers and expand your audience

Social networks like Twitter allow small businesses to locate their current customers or seek out potential customers. For example, if you open a new coffee shop in the neighbourhood, you can perform location based searches to locate anyone tweeting about needing a morning cup of coffee within your area. After locating those tweeting about coffee, you can start reaching out to them, and invite them to come try a hot bevvy at your new coffee shop.

We recently ran a campaign on Facebook for a client and filled their training workshop within 2 days.

2. Social media helps generate leads for one third of the cost

Social media is an easy way to generate leads. For example, you can use Facebook and Twitter advertising to create compelling ads using their extremely powerful targeting options so you can be sure your ads are being served to the right people at the right time. Sharing interesting and stimulating content is another great way for any company to generate leads.

We encourage our clients to build communities not sales pipelines. Think of advocates not prospects. Sell less and sell more.

3. Social media lets you increase brand awareness and reach with little to no budget

Social media for business has allowed companies to increase brand awareness and reach of their brand at little to no cost. The costs associated with these strategies are a lot higher with traditional advertising methods. Recently, marketing departments across companies started hiring social media managers to increase brand awareness and reach through social media. These managers foster relationships with online audiences to help keep expanding the reach of the business.

All of our clients, without exception, have seen their audience grow in a targeted and controlled manner by using tried and tested social media techniques.

Still not convinced about social media for business?

If you’re still not convinced after reading these benefits of social media for business, we’ll happily come and sit down with you to explain in more detail.

Facebook Business Manager – the Good, The Bad and the Ugly

Facebook Business Manager – the Good, The Bad and the Ugly

Facebook Business Manager – the Good, The Bad and the Ugly Truth is Here.

Guest post by Pat Briscoe.

You’d better watch out, you’d better not cry – Business Manager is coming to town, changing Facebook advertising forever from December 31.

With the deadline rapidly looming, we have examined the good, the bad and the ugly of Business Manager; and ask why the world’s largest social network left advertisers no choice but to migrate to a new home.

It’s not exactly the Christmas present most businesses asked for.

But – motivated by complaints from large advertisers and agencies frustrated by the limitations of managing multiple accounts on an interface designed for individuals – Facebook built the new platform from scratch.

The launch earlier this year drew a venomous backlash, but Facebook soaked up the initial criticism and bided its time. After all, with more than a billion people around the globe conducting their commerce and social lives on its pages every day, when Facebook sneezes most of us reach for a box of Kleenex.

If you don’t want to catch a full blown cold, getting to know Facebook Business Manager and how it works should be a top priority before the festive season begins.

What is Facebook Business Manager?

Facebook Business Manager

Facebook says Business Manager is “one place” to manage multiple pages and advertising accounts. But it’s much more.

The big change it heralds is a shift away from a common practice of creating “Grey Accounts”.

A Grey Account is created specifically for advertising and page management purposes and does not have a personal profile.

Individuals can be assigned as administrators of Facebook pages attached to Grey Accounts. This enables them to manage pages and advertising from their personal account without changing logins.

But this practice gave rise to a number of unwanted complications such as:

  • Giving individuals access to sensitive company information from their personal Facebook logins.
  • The risk of data theft from stolen or lost mobile devices.
  • Extra admin to track who has what access, and the exposure to risk if admin rights are not removed for disgruntled former employees with an axe to grind.

To overcome these problems, access to administer Facebook pages and accounts was made available to multiple users via a single Grey Account login. This, too, presented headaches like:

  • Not having control or vision over who was doing what with pages and ad accounts.
  • Full access to all page and account functions for anyone with the login details leading to security risks.
  • Not being included in search results.
  • No access to apps.
  • Being unable to send or receive friend requests.
  • Not seeing updates from other people on Facebook or being able to interact with those people.

On December 31, all that changes. In 2015 Grey Accounts will no longer exist, which means all advertisers must migrate their pages and ad accounts to Facebook Business Manager.

How does Facebook Business Manager Shape Up?

Despite the challenges of managing scores of client Facebook accounts, we were sceptical about the motivation for and the immediate benefits of the switch to Facebook Business Manager. And the assessment from many online was swift and brutal.

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In business, it takes time with anything new to bed down and for customers to adjust to the shock of doing things differently. Despite its popularity, even Facebook is not immune to this rule. Delaying the switch to the new look Facebook Business Manager from October 31 to December 31 was a smart move.

We can summarise our appraisal of Facebook Business Manager as follows:

The Pros

  • No longer need multiple users sharing a single login.
  • It’s easy to manage who has what access to which pages and advertising accounts. Removing or editing access is no more than a couple of clicks away.
  • Major advance in professionally managing Facebook advertising without the worry of constantly changing passwords when staff or change roles.
  • No more constantly switching between personal and business logins to manage different pages and ad accounts. They are all available in one place. Posting as you or the company you’re working for is easy.
  • A step in the right direct for business and agencies that manage multiple Facebook Pages and advertising accounts.

The Cons

  • Works best with Chrome but problems with other browsers.
  • No easy way to bulk migrate customers across from Grey Accounts. The Shared Logins option is poorly explained but helps in this respect.
  • A backlash from businesses and individuals alike who objected to signing in at work with their personal Facebook Account, even though no personal information is seen or shared this way. Facebook says this is to overcome fraud and fake accounts. Many remain unsure this was the motivation for the change and it does not fully overcome the security risk of lost or stolen phones that are left logged into personal Facebook Accounts, which potentially gives thieves full access to sensitive ad account details.
  • Confusion over Claiming and Requesting Access to customer pages and ad accounts. Business Manager doesn’t clearly explain which option you should choose when migrating accounts. This could cause delays in the migration process and lead to confusion from clients or other users who might no longer be able to access advertising accounts.
  • Some early bugs seem to have been ironed out but the user experience has changed in some areas without detailed explanations from Facebook.
  • As far as I can work out, I still can’t share posts from groups to business pages. This is an annoying limitation.
  • Managing ads on mobiles is not as feature rich as it is on desktop.

verdict

The Verdict

While the jury is still out, we see Facebook Business Manager as a step in the right direction.

But there is still some way to go for Facebook to win the respect and trust of advertisers and agencies that remain a major – if not only – revenue source.

With advertising costs set to rise next year, and fewer avenues left open for businesses to grow and engage with their audiences organically, Facebook is walking a fine line.

Business Manager may be a quantum leap in the way advertisers work with Facebook. However, it’s quite easy to come unstuck if you don’t properly and quickly grasp the new concept.

Our advice? Spending as little as £15 per day for one month on one ad is the qualification for Facebook Go, which is geared specifically to help advertisers get the most from their investment.

By signing up you can get on the phone and tell Facebook what you think of Business Manager and how it can be improved.  Give us your feedback too.

 

PBriscoe-65

About the Author: Patrick Briscoe

Pat is the Content Marketing Manager at roi.com.au, a leading digital marketing agency based in Melbourne, Australia. He is an experienced journalist, blogger and social media commentator with a flair for researching and writing articles and marketing content in a variety of different styles for a range of audiences. Pat is fast to adopt new technologies and ideas in order to communicate clearly what they mean for businesses and individuals.

 

 

 

How to Master the World of Pinterest

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Unless you’ve been living without an internet connection for the past couple years, you will have heard of the most recent social media platform – Pinterest. Since its inception in 2012 Pinterest has surpassed 70 million users, outstripped traffic of Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube combined and is the 2nd highest referrer of traffic to websites (second only to Facebook). More importantly for businesses, it generates 27 percent more money than Facebook and 400 percent more than Twitter. So how can you harness Pinterest to drive more traffic and money to your company?

Optimize

When starting off with Pinterest, the most first and most important step is creating a compelling profile. This includes uploading an easily relatable profile picture, choosing the correct business type, including your location, writing your profile description and verifying your site. As easy as it might sound, it can take some planning to find just the right image for your profile picture and description. Using your company logo is probably the best idea for your profile image. When it comes to your actual description, keep it short and simple. Explain your company, what you offer and what users can expect to find in your boards.

imagesSpeaking of boards, the best way to gain new followers is to use keywords in the title. Keep it interesting and focused. Instead of using a very broad, general term like “clothes” separate your products into different themes based on the seasons, certain events or even personality types. Pinterest users aren’t simply looking for products; they’re looking for inspiration so narrowing your boards to specific themes will net you a more engaged audience.

Optimization goes beyond your Pinterest profile. For best results, you need to fully integrate it into your own site. It’s as easy embedding a “Pin it” button to any “pinnable” content on your site. As basic as this might sound, taking this simple action can increase your visibility on Pinterest exponentially.

Engage

As with all social media, Pinterest encourages user engagement. One of the easiest ways to do this is through repinning. When you repin an image to your board, Pinterest will automatically notify the original pinner. It’s a great way to increase your reach and brand awareness to other pinners. When choosing what to repin, choose high quality and appealing images relevant to your brand and add your own description if you like with up to 3 relevant hashtags per pin.

Although repinning is a good strategy, you’ll need to utilize some direct engagement approaches as well. Pins like promotional items or coupons are some of the most used methods that encourage conversion. In fact, pins with a call to action have 80 percent more engagement than those without. If you don’t want to directly give out coupons, contests are a great way to expand your brand visibility. Look to your competitors to see what is and isn’t working for them. See if you can replicate or even improve upon their successes. Don’t forget the power of personal communication. It might take a longer time but when you take the time to respond to comments and leave your own, you’ll build a much stronger relationship with your followers.

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Routine

Your Pinterest profile will require constant maintenance and the occasional tweak here and there. You can alleviate a lot of unnecessary stress by following a daily, weekly and monthly schedule.

  • Daily – Focus on each area of Pinterest engagement: 10 new pins, 10 repins, 10 likes, 10 comments and 10 collaborative pins.
  • Weekly – Add 1 new board a week and make sure that each board has 10 new pins
  • Monthly – Reach out to other collaborative board owners with a request to join. Join at least 1 new board.

Pinterest Superstar

Even if your company isn’t focused on visual products or services, Pinterest is still a great place to market yourself. You’ll need to be more creative when posting but infographics, data charts and even pictures of your employees can all make compelling pins so long as they tell a story. Building your followers will take plenty of time, effort and research. For best results, take advantage of different tools like Tailwindapp, Pinterest analytics and Google analytics to figure out what images perform the best for your company and then make adjustments as necessary.

 

Social Media Marketing: Don’t Let Your ‘But’ Get in the Way!

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Guest post by Pat Briscoe

We’ve heard them all before: Frequently made excuses for not putting social media front and centre of digital marketing strategies.

The time for discussion has passed. Nine out of 10 businesses agree that an active social media profile is vital to remain competitive, increase leads, grow market share and build a loyal following to bolster their brand. Where does that leave the other 10%?

Social media is now one of the four main pillars of digital marketing, sharing the spotlight with Search Engine Optimisation (SEO), Pay Per Click (PPC) advertising and content marketing.

As its significance continues to grow, small businesses fail to acknowledge the role of social media at their peril.

Here are some of the excuses we hear trotted out by some businesses to avoid getting serious about social media marketing.

EXCUSE NUMBER 1: BUT what if I get customer complaints?

Make no buts about it, it’s better to know customers aren’t happy than to see sales tank and your reputation following closely out the front door. Give customers a forum to vent their frustration and sing your praises.

Complaints are often more of an opportunity than a problem. Get on the front foot. Don’t delay asking how you can put things right.

Putting your business on social media puts you in control of how customers perceive you. Everyone can see how you handle complaints. Happy customers will be quick to tell their friends and family about you and soon they’ll be knocking on your door as well.

EXCUSE NUMBER 2: BUT I don’t have time for Social Media

Online marketing has changed. If you are still wasting money on ideas that stopped producing results two years ago, now is a good time to switch plans. Focus on what works now and dump strategies that don’t deliver the goods.

All business owners are time poor. If you truly can’t find any time to market your business and you don’t have staff, engage an agency that has the expertise and experience you need to do it for you.

Did you hear about the business that didn’t have a marketing budget or plan? No? Neither did we.

EXCUSE NUMBER 3: BUT Social Media is not right for my business

Are you serious? If you think this is true, you’ve been the ‘but’ of one of the worst jokes in history.

At last count, Facebook had over 30 million registered users in the UK with the majority using their accounts for half an hour or more every day. Millions more have accounts on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and many more social media channels.

Doubters, get real. Most of your customers can’t live without their mobile devices and they spend more time on social media than watching television.

If your customers are on social media and your competitors are on social media, where does that leave you? Missing out on the conversation, that’s where!

EXCUSE NUMBER 4: BUT I don’t know where to start

Be helpful, informative and transparent. Avoid aggressively selling your products or services.

Social media is all about building trust, nurturing relationships and growing a community of loyal followers. They’ll keep coming back for more if you demonstrate you can listen to what they have to say and deliver them the information they crave.

Sharing all your expertise and experience with customers is a sure way to get their attention and earn their respect. Don’t be afraid to ask for feedback, request testimonials and show how you can have fun.

EXCUSE NUMBER 5: BUT I’ve already tried social media and it doesn’t work

Do your homework, identify the people you want to attract to your business.

Advertising on social media targets potential customers based on what they like. Advertising on search engines attracts people based on what they are researching.

Both approaches have merit. But advertising alone is not enough to convert viewers into customers.

Social media pages that don’t provide visitors with the information they are seeking are no different to poor websites. We’ve all seen Facebook and Twitter pages with no posts or a lone ad with a link to an order form . . . FAIL!

Make sure you are adding value and sharing information that helps move people towards a decision to do business with you.

EXCUSE NUMBER 6: BUT Facebook is not a serious business tool

Like TV, radio and online search engines, social media offers businesses a variety of channels to connect with their customers.

Social media advertising targets people based on what they have confirmed they already like. Communicating directly with people who have a demonstrated interest in a product or service gives social media a powerful advantage over other forms of advertising and communication.

Social media leverages off word-of-mouth and the concept of social proof. Noticing that a friend already “Likes” a product or service helps break down barriers of trust more quickly than with advertising alone.

Not serious? I must be a clown after all!

EXCUSE NUMBER 7: BUT how do I assess my ROI?

Let me recap:

  1. Growing an audience.
  2. Nurturing relationships.
  3. Building brand loyalty.
  4. Encouraging engagement.
  5. Generating referrals.
  6. Social proof.
  7. More leads.
  8. Increasing testimonials.
  9. Attracting more repeat business.
  10. Creating a platform for direct advertising.

All of these benefits can be measured.

Social media’s time has arrived. Wouldn’t it be crazy to let your ’but’ get in the way of building a successful social business.

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About the Author: Patrick Briscoe

Pat is the Content Marketing Manager at roi.com.au, a leading digital marketing agency based in Melbourne, Australia. He is an experienced journalist, blogger and social media commentator with a flair for researching and writing articles and marketing content in a variety of different styles for a range of audiences. Pat is fast to adopt new technologies and ideas in order to communicate clearly what they mean for businesses and individuals.

6 Ways to Grow Your Twitter Audience Fast

TwitterFollowers

Guest post by Pat Briscoe

Experienced Twitter disciples are quick to espouse its virtues as a way to connect with customers, market a business and spy on the competition.

They’ll also point out how Twitter can be used to monitor feedback, deliver updates and build brand loyalty.

If you haven’t jumped on the social media bandwagon for your business, Twitter is a wise way to start because you can build an audience and get tangible results fast.

But it’s important to do some preparation before you take a leap into the great unknown.

1. Identify Your Audience
It sounds ridiculously simplistic and doesn’t need a second thought, does it? Well, think again. Careful consideration of who you want to connect with on Twitter is one of the cornerstones of success. Identifying who your customers are, your major competitors and leading thinkers in your area of special interest is a good starting point. Informing your customers about how they can find you on Twitter is an easy one, working out how to find Twitter users who share similar interests can take time but you have to start somewhere.

2. Determine The Content
The best entrepreneurs are often driven to fix something they believe is broken or create something that doesn’t exist. This gives them a powerful story to tell. But what you share is a reflection of your personality. Share your frustrations, your victories, some personal passions. Most of all, strive to educate and inform your followers by being as transparent and helpful as possible. Remember to “Tell, Not Sell”. You’ll soon develop a good reputation and word will spread. Make sure you use your Twitter feed to share information from thought leaders in your industry to show you are keeping up with the latest changes.

3. Advertise
Twitter is a complex beast. It holds masses of data that gives you access to an instant audience of potential customers. Once you know who you want to talk to and have developed some goals about the conversations you want to have, advertise to your prospects and they’ll start knocking at your door.

4. Tweet Tweet Tweet Tweet Tweet
Keep the information flowing. Set some goals around daily activity volumes. Not everything you share will strike a chord with all of your audience. Try to vary the tone of the message so your Tweets appeal to a wide selection of your followers. If your business offers a range of different products or services, make sure you are keeping followers updated with developments in all areas. If you don’t post relevant, useful information regularly, growth in your follower numbers will sputter rather than soar.

5. Retweet, Follow, Ask Questions
Sharing other people’s Tweets and following people is a quick way to grab their attention and start engaging with them. Set goals of trying to follow people back who follow you if they are your customers, have a common interest or an established large network of followers. Broadening your network like this can produce staggering results if you have set out to grow a large audience.

6. Improve Engagement
Twitter followers “engage” with you by clicking on, sharing, retweeting and favouriting your links and Tweets. The best results are achieved by following a few simple rules. Include hashtags, images, videos, and links to blogs in your Tweets. Headlines are important too. Tweets containing a number, a question or that lead to a set of instructions on how to get better at something attract more engagement if the content is on subject for your audience.

 

PBriscoe-65About the Author: Patrick Briscoe

Pat is the Content Marketing Manager at roi.com.au, a leading digital marketing agency based in Melbourne, Australia. He is an experienced journalist, blogger and social media commentator with a flair for researching and writing articles and marketing content in a variety of different styles for a range of audiences. Pat is fast to adopt new technologies and ideas in order to communicate clearly what they mean for businesses and individuals.

 

 

8 Reasons Why Facebook Ads Should be on Your Radar

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Guest blog by Patrick Briscoe

The rise of social media as an advertising platform is redefining the online marketing landscape for small and medium businesses (SMEs).

Facebook, Twitter and Instagram have all jumped aboard the juggernaut – soon to be joined by Snapchat – giving advertisers more pathways than ever to target their market directly through social media.

Two clear strategies are now available: Keyword searchers ‘Pull’ ads from Google using Adwords, while Facebook advertisers ‘Push’ traffic through display ads on social newsfeeds using Twitter Cards and Facebook. Both methods use Pay Per Click technology.

The choices are welcome news for SMEs with relatively small marketing budgets who have given up on generic banner advertising due to shockingly low Click Through Rates (CTR).

While conversion rates for Google Adwords are generally higher because they are being viewed by people in research mode, targeted social media display ads commonly have a larger audience. Converting a smaller percentage of a much bigger audience potentially generates more revenue in a more cost effective way.

For businesses with active social media profiles that focus on building trust and respect through transparency and genuine engagement, attracting new customers this way can increase brand loyalty and repeat business.

Without question, spreading the marketing spend across both the ‘Push’ and ‘Pull’ channels makes sense, which is why social media advertising is beginning to have its day in the sun.

But results with both strategies can be patchy, unless advertising is accompanied by rigorous testing, frequent reviews and rapid changes. If one tactic doesn’t get results, scrap it and move onto the next.

Benefits of Facebook Ads

1. Cheaper: The average Cost Per Click (CPC) of Facebook Ads is about $0.90 compared with about $2.70 for Adwords.
2. Faster: Facebook ads can reach an audience quickly. Target audience can be altered and tested on the run. Campaigns are shorter, more flexible and get faster results
3. Better targeting: Facebook Ads can be targeted to as broad or narrow a market as desired and can be specific to a particular campaign or as wide as an age demographic.
4. Retargeting: Like Google Adwords, Facebook Ads can follow users anonymously as they travel the web if they have already clicked on an ad.
5. More control: The advertiser can determine who sees the ad and how many times they click on it.
6. Brand building: Facebook leverages off word-of-mouth and the concept of social proof. Noticing that a friend already “Likes” a product helps break down barriers of trust more quickly than with advertising alone.

What the numbers say

1. The time mobile users are spending on Facebook is now almost the same as Google: Mobile Internet users are spending 17% of their time on Facebook compared with 18% of their time on all Google channels.
2. Twitter and Facebook are topping the charts for online advertising revenue growth in the US on all devices: At 79% and 47% respectively, Twitter and Facebook are easily leaving Google’s annual ad revenue growth of 33% in the shade.

Worldwide Online Mobile ad Revenue Share

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Figures in the graph above are courtesy of the MarketRealist website. They show a shift in spending from search engine to social network advertising. And they indicate the momentum is gaining pace.

Stats released last week in a US study by BIA/Kelsey showed small businesses spending on social media activities for a range of purposes is continuing to grow. More than half of those surveyed confirmed they had a business page on Facebook and one in five had bought a Facebook Ad or Promoted Post.

The study also found businesses were using social networks to:

• Build an online brand.
• Listen and respond to what is being said about their business.
• Recruit new employees.

These trends show social media not only generates leads for small businesses, it is a key tool for managing relationships with customers, employees and the wider public.
When combined with a strategy that seeks to add value, educate and inform an audience, businesses are seeing positive results in a range of social media marketing metrics.

It all adds up to a strong case for SMEs to include social media advertising in their marketing plans. At the very least, it’s a good way to build a base for your business on a range of social media channels and to drive traffic to your website generally or for specific campaigns.

PBriscoe-65About the Author: Patrick Briscoe

Pat is the Content Marketing Manager at roi.com.au, a leading digital marketing agency based in Melbourne, Australia. He is an experienced journalist, blogger and social media commentator with a flair for researching and writing articles and marketing content in a variety of different styles for a range of audiences. Pat is fast to adopt new technologies and ideas in order to communicate clearly what they mean for businesses and individuals.

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